Hitler's Tyranny

by Ralf Georg Reuth / translated by Peter Lewis

‘An urgent reminder of what happened the last time the world mistook a psychotic warmonger for a rational, power-hungry politician.’
James Hawes, author of The Shortest History of Germany

‘Even those who, like myself, disagree with some of this book, it provides an intriguing perspective on Hitler from one of Germany’s foremost experts on the subject.’
Brendan Simms, author of Hitler’s American Gamble: Pearl Harbour and Germany’s March to Global War

Despite a wealth of literature on the subject, the Nazi tyranny remains difficult to understand and interpret. In Hitler’s Tyranny, Ralf Georg Reuth examines ten aspects of Hitler’s dictatorship. Looking anew at some assumptions, he explores whether anti-Semitism was more pronounced in Germany than elsewhere in Europe; whether Versailles was really responsible for Hitler’s rise; and why so many Germans decided to follow a racial fanatic. The disturbing answers provide a picture that shows how Hitler was not only an inevitable consequence of German history but also the product of chance, deception, and seduction.

Eschewing a conventional chronological approach in favour of a forensic analysis of Hitler’s actions — both as chancellor and military commander — Reuth shifts the focus to the mindset and modus operandi of the dictator himself. The portrait that emerges is one of a murderous fantasist and political opportunist driven by an all-embracing ideology of racial superiority, Reuth’s account courts controversy on a few points but offers a fascinating counterpoint to recent scholarship.

RALF GEORG REUTH is a German journalist and historian. He has written several books on German history, including major biographies of Hitler, Goebbels, and Rommel, and was the editor of The Goebbels Diaries.

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